confessions of an english opium eater essay

this balanced account, was altogether more squalid. "Confessions of an English Opium Eater Essay Questions". Hoagwood, Choice, September 2011. Robert Morrison is Queens National Scholar at Queens University in Kingston, Ontario, where he maintains the Thomas De Quincey homepage.

De Quinceys account of his opiated experiences has left an indelible print on the literature of addiction, and modern commentators continue to grapple with his legacy, though there is no agreement on whether he should be blamed, or absolved, or lauded. In this lucid, deeply researched biography, Robert Morrison makes plain that De Quincey wasnt just a recreational user, but truly a slave to his habit. Robert Morrisons very finebiography of Thomas De Quincey. Confessions : But now, at last, came over me, from the mere excess of bodily sufferings and mental disappointments, a frantic and rapturous re-agency. The English Opium-eater should now be regarded as the standard and indispensable biography of Thomas De Quincey.

confessions of an english opium eater essay

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Martin Haggerty, The Coleridge Bulletin, Summer 2010. Is Burroughs De Quinceys successor? This one-page guide includes a plot summary and brief analysis. It also helps create the atmosphere of addiction, in which the user becomes solipsistic, uninterested in anything except his own relationship with his substance. This is an engrossing and deeply sympathetic study of a man who suffered more than his share of miseries, more than his haul of horrors, yet who left an indelible mark on nineteenth-century literature. Rrison makes vivid the intellectual and moral versatility of his subjectMorrison explores De Quinceys contradictions, and he explains the multiple motivations and effects of writers and publishers alike in this period of massive literary commercialization and development. Eighty-five years later, in, the Gay Science (1882 Friedrich Nietzsche too discusses drugs, but he has a very different story to tell. The problem runs down through the history of drug use and especially its link to creativity which can be seen at one of its high points during the moment of English romanticism within which De Quincey was writing, but which we could also trace right. De Quincey loved London, hated London, feared London, was addicted to London: city of dreadful night in which one comes constantly upon such knotty problems of alleys, such enigmatic entries, and such sphinxs riddles of streets without thoroughfares, as must, I conceive, baffle the audacity.